by Devadatta Kīrtideva Aśvamitra

April 20, 2017

Glory to the Guru, whose teaching allow you to see the rope beyond the snake appearance; glory to the Guru who teaches you how distinguish yourself from the body, from the mind, from the ego; glory to the Guru who help you to realize that you are the Absolute Non-dual Reality. What I am about to write could not be true without the previous instruction and approval of the Guru. Glory to the Guru, to the Paramguru and to the Parameṣṭhi Guru, inexhaustible sources of unfailing knowledge.

This series of brief articles begins here with the purpose of clarifying the ideas of the Hindū Authorities about some basic concept of the Western Traditions...

by Devadatta Kīrtideva Aśvamitra

April 19, 2017

In the article “Religion and Dharma” we have described the main points of difference between the two concepts. However there is another aspect that sharply divides the Western Religions and the Hindū Dharma.

In Hindū Dharma at every social and intellectual level it is well known what is mokṣa, the fourth and supreme aim (puruṣārtha) of human life. And no Hindū ignores that mokṣa means Liberation from saṃsāra.

by Devadatta Kīrtideva Aśvamitra

April 19, 2017

The meaning of the word “initiation” correctly expresses the saṃskṛta term dīkṣā. It derives from the Latin term initiatio, which described the ritual acceptation of a disciple in an initiatory organization, known as mysterium.

by Devadatta Kīrtideva Aśvamitra

April 29, 2017

In Archaic Greece anyone who was not satisfied of the narrow aims and means of religious exoterism, had to applay to a sanctuary of some Mysteries to be initiated. There, the mystagogue ritually prepared the aspirant to initiation, prescribing him purifications, fasts and other preliminary rituals.

by Devadatta Kīrtideva Aśvamitra

May 14, 2017

With the previous short articles we intended to provide the traditional hindū readers with the first critical tools to understand the general situation of Western Civilization.

Further details will be provided with next contributions, in this case referred to a particular field or period. By gathering this information, our readers will be able to dissolve the intricate knots that make Western Civilization so difficult to understand...

by Gaṇapati

May 28, 2017

There is a “Holy Land” par excellence, which is the prototype for any other. That spiritual centre, to which the other sacred lands are subject, is the seat of the Primeval Tradition, or Sanātana Dharma, from which all the other Traditions, in dhārmika or religious shape, have derived adapting themselves to a time, to a place and to a mankind.

by Durgādevī

June 04, 2017

The Greek poet Hesiod has been the first to hand down the most important information about the ancient western mythology. He wrote that during the Golden Age men lived without suffering anguish, misery and old age. They fed on the fruits that the earth spontaneously offered in abundance. Human beings were born directly from the earth and there was no sexual generation.

by Durgādevī

June 25, 2017

Plato informs us that for the Atlanteans the preferred sacrificial victim was the bull. In Greek mythology, the sacrifice of the bull has been established during the Bronze Age by Titan Prometheus, brother of Atlas.

 

by D. K. Aśvamitra

July 16, 2017

Before addressing the subject of ancient Greek civilization and its religion, let us point out some notes that explain its general characteristics. We start exposing some aspects of the dark side of this civilization that corresponds to its Antlantidean component. This preface is necessary considering that these features have negatively influenced the whole Western civilization until contemporary times.

by D. K. Aśvamitra

July 23, 2017

The "bright side" of Greek civilization is the result of positive adjusts due to the Hyperborean influence on Greek society of Atlantean origin. Ancient Greek historians, in fact, tell the several mysterious visits to Greece by Hyperborean emissaries coming from the North.

by D. K. Aśvamitra

August 06, 2017

Esoterism, the Mysteries: In ancient Greece, from immemorial time, esoterism, the initiatic dominion, had the form of Mysteries. As already explained in the third article in this series (3- Initiation and Mysticism), Mystery means something incommunicable, as well as myste, the initiate, has the same meaning and etymological origin of muni, the one who remains silent.

by Durgādevī

September 03, 2017

Pythagoras was born in 570 a. C. in Samo, the easternmost among the Greek Islands, important site of commercial and cultural exchanges. His works have been lost. The information about his life and his teachings comes from later authors who handed down what they knew about him mostly by oral traditions and by some written texts lost over the time.

by Durgādevī

September 23, 2017

Plato (428/427 B.C.) was born in Athens from an illustrious noble family: His father was descendant of Codrus, the last King of Athens and his mother of Solon. Therefore he had an aristocratic education.

He had Socrates as teacher and, in his works he transmitted the thought and the personality of the philosopher. However, Socrates cannot be considered Plato's dīkṣāguru, because he always refused to be initiated to the Mysteries.

 

by Durgādevī

October 22, 2017

In conclusion of this series of articles concerning the ancient Greek Civilization we give a brief description of the two Epic Poems that de facto became its sacred texts. Greek literature begins in the 8th century B. C. with these Epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey, attributed to the blind poet Homer, about whom we have little information. Probably he was born in Chios, where a guild of bards (kavi), called Homerids, had been active for many centuries.

 

 

by Durgādevī

November 05, 2017

The second Poem of Homer, the Odyssey (Ὀδύσσεια, read Odǘsseia), relates the sea travels of Odysseus (Ὀδυσσεύς, read Odüssèus), the Greek hero returning to his Kingdom, the island of Ithaca, after the destruction of Troy.

 

by D. K. Aśvamitra

November 11, 2017

In 337 B.C. Philip the II, King of Macedonia, seized the whole Greece, taking it away from the Persian hegemony. Macedonia was a small kingdom located north of Greece, considered by the Hellenes as a barbarian country. The great military and administrative ability of its ruling dynasty led Macedonia to become a colossal Empire. Alexander the Great, son of Philip the II, defeated the Persians and the Egyptians arriving to conquer all the territories from Greece, to the Nile and the Indus rivers.

by D. K. Aśvamitra

January 07, 2018

In ancient Greek, gnosis (γνῶσις, read gnòsis) meant the knowledge reached through the initiation path of the Mysteries. The word is related to the saṃskṛta term jñāna both in etymology and purport. Therefore, it was synonymous with sophia (σοφία, read sofìa), wisdom or sapience. However, gnosis also had the sense of the intellectual and discriminative method used to attain wisdom and, in this sense, it can be well rendered in saṃskṛta as Brahmavidyā. Therefore, the Gnostes (γνώστης, read gnòstes, sskr .jñāni) was a man who, having been prepared theoretically by philosophy and after having been initiated into the Mysteries, had attained real knowledge through intellectual inquiry (jñānaśakti vicara), rather than through sacrificial rituals or devotion.

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Vedāṇgas, arts and other sādhanās

by Gaṅgā Bhāratī

January 13, 2018

Saturno è il più venerato dei nove pianeti (navagraha) e il suo culto è presente in tutto il subcontinente indiano. Gli hindū sono consapevoli della potente influenza che Saturno esercita sulla vita umana e adottano diversi metodi per accrescerne o contrastarne gli effetti benevoli o nefasti.

Alcune considerazioni generali sul concetto di pianeta (graha) favoriranno la comprensione degli argomenti trattati. In primo luogo il termine sanscrito graha significa afferrare, stringere, trattenere. I graha sono corpi celesti che esercitano la loro potenza sugli esseri che vivono sulla terra e regolano la legge del karma.

by Rādhikā Nandakumāra (Trad. di Maunya Saumya)

February 24, 2018

Lo scopo principale del presente articolo è delineare ed illustrare gli otto tipi di eroina (aṣṭanāyikā) secondo le tradizioni della danza indiana. Intendiamo far apprezzare al lettore colto i diversi stili e tradizioni e, al tempo stesso, far cogliere la natura intrinseca che ne accresce il valore e ne amplifica la portata al di là dei confini culturali consolidatisi nel corso dei secoli nel grande Bhārata, l’India. Illustreremo ciascuna nāyikā per mezzo di elementi tratti dalla danza e dalla musica.

by Rādhikā Nandakumāra

February 24, 2018

The basic purpose of this article is to delineate and explain the eight kinds of Heroins : aṣṭanāyikā in Indian Dancing traditions. It is done with the intension that the learned reader appreciates the styles and traditions while appreciating its inherent character which enhances and liberates its scope beyond its cultural moors which had so much stabilized since centuries in the great Bhārata. It is essential to illustrate each nāyikā with an item of dance and music. Thus a few examples are also given hither and thither during the course of this writing. I believe that nothing explains more than its abhinaya done with on-time creativity and gusto. I intend to do this with suitable lecture and demonstrations, which, in time, I hope to upload such videos to various online media. I request the learned audience to be with me in tandem with my spirits of dedication and utter ecstasy.

by Devadatta Kīrtideva Aśvamitra

March 23, 2019

Svāmī Prakāśānandendra Sarasvatī Mahārājajī, in un suo memorabile upadeśa, produsse la seguente metafora: “Il nostro corpo è come una grande casa dalle porte e finestre aperte, attraverso cui entra il vento (vāyu o prāṇa); esso percorre le nostre stanze e corridoi, per poi uscire. Quando si trova fuori del corpo lo chiamiamo “vento”; quando, invece, sta circolando per il corpo, lo chiamiamo “il nostro vento”.

Da questa prima immagine prendiamo lo spunto per cercare di capire cosa sia il prāṇa.

by Gian Giuseppe Filippi

August 24, 2019

In tutta l’India s’usa ripetere, in un sanscrito popolaresco, il motto che comincia con “Prathama guru tataḥ mātā”: invero, il primo guru è la madre. Questa concezione è talmente condivisa sia dagli ambienti iniziatici dediti alla metafisica più elevata sia da incolti rappresentanti di quel buonsenso, che si usa definire “saggezza popolare”, che la credenza diffusa vuole che si tratti di un qualche aforisma vedico proveniente da un non meglio identificato testo sacro. In realtà, pur esprimendo una concezione dottrinalmente ineccepibile, il motto non è niente più di un proverbio della cui origine si sono perse le tracce. Ciò nondimeno il motto, che prosegue con “il padre è il secondo, il guru è il terzo”, è una sorta di felice sintesi di varie affermazioni testuali, laddove si conferma tassativamente la triplicità della funzione magistrale.

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